Month: November 2011

BEST SOUND OSCAR TRIVIA

Oscaraward

Sometimes the lesser known categories on Oscar night, bring the up the strangest of Academy Award Trivia.    This is a statistical look at trivia surround the Best Sound Mixing / Best Sound Editing category. 

Sound Editing
39 films have been award with the Sound Editing Academy Award 

 


Films that have won Best Sound Editing (est 1963) + Best Actor
None

Films that have won Best Sound Editing (est 1963) + Best Actress
 None

 

Films that have won Best Sound Editing (est 1963) + Best Director
 
1995:  Braveheart
1997:  Titanic
1998: Saving Private Ryan
2009: The Hurt Locker

 

Films that have won Best Sound Editing (est 1963) + Best Director + Best Picture
1995: Braveheart
1997: Titanic
2009: The Hurt Locker 

 

Most wins for Sound Editing award

3 times:

Ben Burtt (Raiders of the Lost Ark, E.T,  Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade)
Charles L Campbell (E.T, Back to the Future, Who Framed Roger Rabbit)
Richard Hymns (Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Ryan)
Richard King (Master and Commander , The Dark Knight, Inception)
Gary Rydstorm (Terminator 2, Jurassic Park, Saving Private Ryan) 

 


Sound Mixing
79 films have won the Sound Mixing Academy Award 

 

Films that have won Best Sound Mixing (est 1929)+ Best Actor

1942: Yankee Doodle Dandy
1956: The King and I
1959: Ben-Hur
1964: My Fair Lady
1967: In The Heat of the Night
1970: Patton
1984: Amadeus
2000: Gladiator
2004: Ray

 

 

Films that have won Best Sound Mixing + Best Actress
1972: Cabaret

 

Films that have won Best Sound Mixing (est 1929)  + Best Director
(20 of the 22 below have gone on to win Best Picture) 

 

 1950: All About Eve
 1953: From Here to Eternity
 1959: Ben-Hur
 1961: West Side Story
 1962: Lawrence of Arabia
 1964: My Fair Lady
 1965: Sound of Music
 1968: Oliver! 
 1970: Patton
 1972: Cabaret
 1978: The Deer Hunter
 1984: Amadeus
 1985: Out of Africa
 1986: Platoon
 1987: The Last Emperor
 1990: Dance with Wolves
 1996: The English Patient
 1997: Titanic
 1998: Saving Private Ryan
 2003: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King
 2008: Slumdog Millionaire
 2009: The Hurt Locker 

Films that have won Best Sound Mixing (est 1929)  + Best Director + Best Picture

 1950: All About Eve
 1953: From Here to Eternity
 1959: Ben-Hur
 1961: West Side Story
 1962: Lawrence of Arabia
 1964: My Fair Lady
 1965: Sound of Music
 1968: Oliver! 
 1970: Patton
 1978: The Deer Hunter
 1984: Amadeus
 1985: Out of Africa
 1986: Platoon
 1987: The Last Emperor
 1990: Dance with Wolves
 1996: The English Patient
 1997: Titanic
 2003: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King
 2008: Slumdog Millionaire
 2009: The Hurt Locker  

Most wins for Sound Mixing award

5 times:
Douglas Shearer 
(The Big House, Naughty Marietta, San Fransisco, Strike Up the Band, The Great Caruso)

Fred Hynes 
(Oklahoma!, South Pacific, The Alamo, West Side Story, The Sound of Music) 

 

Both Awards

Films that have won Best Sound Editing (est 1963) + Best Sound Mixing

(note that four of these films are Steven Spielberg directed)

 1966: Grand Prix
 1981: Raiders of the Lost Ark
 1982: E.T
 1983: The Right Stuff
 1991: Terminator 2
 1993: Jurassic Park
 1994: Speed
 1997: Titanic
 1998: Saving Private Ryan
 1999: Matrix
 2005: King Kong
 2006: The Bourne Ultimatum
 2009: Hurt Locker
 2010: Inception 

Films that have won Best Sound Editing (est 1963) + Best Sound Mixing + Best Picture

1997: Titanic
2009: Hurt Locker 

 



 

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BEST PICTURE WINNERS

From ‘Wings’ to ‘The King’s Speech’ – this page is a central place for indepth facts and trivia about every Academy Award winner for Best Picture from 1927 – Present Day.    Research conducted and collated by Rhett Bartlett. 
(constantly under construction) 

Oscaraward

OVERVIEW
There have been 83 films which have won the Best Picture Oscar.
82 winners have been ‘talkies’.  
1 winner has been a ‘silent’ film.
(although there was a silent version of All Quiet on the Western Front that was theatrically released)

TITLES
Shortest film title to win:  Gigi
Longest film title to win:  Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

No film title that poses a question (ends with a question mark) has won Best Picture
(‘How Green Was My Valley’ does not end with a question mark)

Only film title with exclamation point (!): Oliver!
Only film title with a number: Around the World in 80 Days.

 

BEST PICTURE + OTHER CATEGORIES

Best Picture + Best Director

Only on 21 occasions has Best Director NOT won Best Picture.
The last time was 2005.   Best Director (Ang Lee).  Best Picture (Crash). 
In every decade since the 1920’s, there has been at least one year where Best Pic + Best Dir did not match.  

Best Picture + Best Actress
1934: It Happened One Night
1936: The Great Ziegfeld
1939: Gone With The Wind
1942: Mrs Miniver
1975: One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest
1977: Annie Hall
1983: Terms of Endearment 
1989: Driving Miss Daisy
1991: Silence of the Lambs
1998: Shakespeare In Love
2004: Million Dollar Baby

Best Picture + Best Actor
1934: It Happened One Night
1944: Going My Way 
1945: The Lost Weekend
1946: The Best Years Of Our Lives
1948: Hamlet
1949: Broderick Crawford
1954: On the Waterfront
1955: Marty
1957: Bridge on the River Kwai
1959: Ben-Hur
1964: My Fair Lady
1966: A Man For All Seasons
1967: In The Heat of the Night
1970: Patton
1971: The French Connection
1972: The Godfather
1975: One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest
1979: Kramer vs Kramer
1982: Gandhi
1984: Amadeus
1988: Rain Man
1991: Silence of the Lambs
1994: Forrest Gump
1999: American Beauty
2000: Gladiator
2010: The King’s Speech

Best Picture + Best Actor + Best Actress 
1934: It Happened One Night
1975: One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest
1991: Silence of the Lambs

Best Picture + Best Supporting Actor
1937: Life of Emile Zola
1941: How Green Was My Valley
1944: Going My Way
1946: Best Years of Our Lives
1950: All About Eve
1953: From Here to Eternity
1959: Ben-Hur
1961: West Side Story
1974: Godfather II
1978: The Deer Hunter
1980: Ordinary People
1983: Terms of Endearment
1992: Unforgiven
2004: Million Dollar Baby
2007: No Country For Old Men

Best Picture + Best Actor + Best Supporting Actor
1944: Going My Way
1946: Best Years of Our Lives
1959: Ben-Hur

Best Picture + Best Supporting Actress
1939: Gone With The Wind
1942: Mrs Miniver
1947: Gentleman’s Agreement
1949: All The King’s Men
1953: From Here to Eternity
1954: On The Waterfront
1961: West Side Story
1979: Kramer vs Kramer
1996: The English Patient
1998: Shakespeare in Love
2001: A Beautiful Mind
2002: Chicago

Best Picture + Best Actress + Best Supporting Actress 
1939: Gone With The Wind
1942: Mrs Miniver
1998: Shakespeare in Love

Best Picture + Best Actor + Best Actress + Best Supporting Actress 
None 

Best Picture + Best Actor + Best Actress + Best Supporting Actor
None

Best Picture + Best Actress + Best Supporting Actress + Best Supporting Actor
None

Best Picture + Best Director + Best Supporting Actress (est. 1936)
1939- Gone With The Wind
1942- Mrs Miniver
1947- Gentleman’s Agreement
1953- From Here to Eternity
1954- On The Waterfront
1961- West Side Story
1979- Kramer vs Kramer
1996- The English Patient
2001- A Beautiful Mind

Best Picture + Best Cinematography:

 1939: Gone With The Wind
 1940: Rebecca
 1941: How Green Was My Valley
 1942: Mrs Miniver
 1951: An American In Paris
 1953: From Here to Eternity
 1954: On The Waterfront
 1956: Around the World In 80 Days
 1957: Bridge on the River Kwai
 1958: Gigi
 1959: Ben-Hur 
 1961: West Side Story
 1962: Lawrence of Arabia
 1964: My Fair Lady 
 1966: A Man For All Seasons
 1982: Gandhi
 1985: Out of Africa
 1987: The Last Emperor
 1990: Dances with Wolves
 1993: Schindler’s List
 1995: Braveheart
 1996: The English Patient
 1997: Titanic
 1999: American Beauty
 2008: Slumdog Millionaire

Best Picture + Art Direction (first established in 1948)
1948: Hamlet
1950: All About Eve
1951: An American In Paris
1958: Gigi
1959: Ben Hur
1961: West Side Story
1964: My Fair Lady
1966: A Man For All Seasons
1973: The Sting
1981: Chariots of Fire
1982: Gandhi
1984: Amadeus
1987: The Last Emperor
1996: The English Patient
1997: Titanic
1998: Shakespeare in Love
2000: Gladiator
2002: Moulin Rogue
2003: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King

Best Picture + Best Cinematography + Art Direction (est in 1948)
 1951: An American In Paris
 1958: Gigi
 1959: Ben-Hur 
 1961: West Side Story
 
1964: My Fair Lady 
 1966: A Man For All Seasons
 1982: Gandhi
 1987: The Last Emperor 
 1996: The English Patient
 1997: Titanic 

Best Picture + Best Make Up (est 1981)
 1984: Amadeus
 1989: Driving Miss Daisy
 1995: Braveheart
 2003: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King

Best Picture + Best Cinematography + Art Direction (est in 1948) + Makeup (est 1981)
 
None 

Best Picture + Best Sound Editing (est. in 1960)
 1995: Braveheart 
 1997: Titanic
 2009: The Hurt Locker

Best Picture + Best Sound Editing (est. in 1960) + Best MakeUp
 
1995: Braveheart 
 

Best Picture + Best Sound Editing (est. in 1960) + Sound Mixing
 
 1997: Titanic
  2009: The Hurt Locker

 
Best Picture with no acting nominations.

 1927: Wings
 1929/30: All Quiet on the Western Front
 1931/2: Grand Hotel
 1951: An American In Paris
 1952: The Greatest Show on Earth
 1956: Around the World in 80 Days
 1958: Gigi
 1987: The Last Emperor
 1995: Braveheart
 2003: The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King
 2008: Slumdog Millionaire

 
Best Picture winners NOT nominated for a screenplay award

 1927/28: Wings
 1928/29: Broadway Melody
 1931/1932: Grand Hotel
 1932/1933: Cavalcade
 1948: Hamlet
 1965: Sound of Music
 1997: Titanic 


 

  
MILESTONES for each Best Picture Winner.

1927/1928 – Wings
 – First silent film to win Best Picture  
 (nb: All Quiet on the Western Front was also released in a silent version)

 – First film to win all categories it was nominated in (2)
– First/Only film to win Best Picture and Engineering Effects
– First film to win without any acting nominations
– First film to win without any directing nomination
– First film to win without any writing nomination
– Last silent film to win Best Picture 

 

Talking about silent films – a history of Best Picture Nominees

 

Honorary Oscar recipient Kevin Brownlow once wrote ‘the parade has gone by’, when describing silent films.  But maybe it hasn’t.  
Maybe it has stopped on our doorstep one last time, for us to honor the medium, before its final journey into the sunset. 

With the enticing prospect of a silent film (‘The Artist’) winning the Best Picture Oscar ; the time is ripe to look at the history of silent films nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards. 

The most famous of them all is Wings.

Wings1927beta

The only silent film (to date) to receive the ‘Best Picture’ Academy Award.

It did so without a single acting nomination, or a directing nomination.  

Its accolade was the result of outstanding aerial battle footage; which resulted in winning the ‘Engineering Effects’ category. Nominated for only two awards – it won them both. 

The film starred Clara Bow, Buddy Rogers and Gary Cooper in his fourth credited role.  
But it also starred Hedda Hopper,  – the 38 year old gossip columnist was uncredited as Mrs Powell – ‘Buddy’ Rogers’ mother.  

For a film that won the first Best Picture – it is surprising it has never received a DVD release. Late in 2011 – the film will finally receive a ‘restored’ Blu Ray release.

———————————– 

 

Sunrise1927dvd

Purists will say that another film won the Best Picture Oscar that year –  F W Murnau’s ‘Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans’ was the recipient of the “Unique and Artistic Picture” award- one that focused more on the artistic strength of the film. 

It failed to receive a Best Acting nomination and a directing nomination, however did receive the Best Actress Award for Janet Gaynor (the Academy awarded her for three roles that year – Street Angel, 7th Heaven, Sunrise – all silent films).
It also received the first ever ‘Cinematography’ award , and lost in the Art Direction category.

Murnau himself appears in the film – uncredited as a dancer. 
4 nominations for 3 wins.  

———————————– 

Racket1928dvdr

The Racket received just one Oscar nomination – ‘Best Picture’
Directed by Lewis MIlestone, who would win Best Director Oscar two years later, it was produced by Howard Hughes.
In his private collection he had the only known surviving copy, and it was from that a restoration was able to take place, and the film screened in the last ten years.  

———————————– 

7th Heaven won three of the major awards on Oscar night. 
Best Actress for Janet Gaynor (see: Sunrise entry above) , Best Director for Frank Borzage and Best Writing for Benjamin Glazer (he would win again 12 years later for writing ‘Arise , My Love’)
In any other year, that would have indicated a near lock for the Best Picture Award, but it was beaten by ‘Wings‘ and also lost the Art Direction category.
It received 5 nominations in total – currently the equal most by a silent film (along with ‘The Patriot’) 

 ———————————–

Chang1927dvdr

Change: A Drama of Wilderness was effectively a staged documentary film that received a sole nomination for ‘Unique and Artistic Production’.
It was directed by two – Merian Cooper and Ernest Schoedsack – who collaborated later for ‘King Kong’ 
The story was written by Achmed Abdullah – who earlier wrote the screenplay for ‘The Thief of Bagdad’ (note: there is no ‘h’ in the Bagdad)
 

———————————–

King Vidor’s famous The Crowd received two Oscar nominations – Best Director and ‘Unique and Artistic Production’ 
Vidor would receive 5 Best Director nominations and never win (he would lose three times to directors called ‘Frank), but received an Honorary Oscar in 1979.  
In 1981 he would present Best Director , along with George Cukor , to Robert Redford for ‘Ordinary People’. 

In 1989- The Crowd was one of the first 25 films chosen for the Library of Congress National Film Registry.  

———————————–

The Patriot holds the distinction currently as being the last silent film nominated for Best Picture.
Directed by Ernst Lubitsch, it received 5 Academy Award nominations – losing Best Actor, Art Direction, Best Director and Best Picture. 
It did however win the Best Writing Oscar for Hanns Kraly. 

The Patriot’s status is as a ‘lost film’ – the only Best Picture nominee of which no complete print has been located. 

 

Academy Award – Best Picture – Silent Film – Statistics

Number of Silent films nominated for Best Picture:   7  (4 for ‘Best Picture’ / 3 ‘Unique + Artistic’)

Last Silent film nominated for Best Picture:   The Patriot 1928/1929 

Silent film which has the most nominations:  7th Heaven (5) , The Patriot (5).

Notable categories in which a silent film has yet to be nominated in:
Editing , Best Supp Actor , Best Supporting Actress (these were created after advent of sound films)

No silent film has ever won Best Picture and Best Actor in the same year.

No silent film has ever won Best Picture and Best Director in the same year. 

– By Rhett Bartlett
@dialmformovies 

 

5 Academy Award facts that, guaranteed, you never knew.

Side_oscar

1. Meryl Streep has never presented a competitive Oscar.

Hard to believe isn’t it.  Having herself been nominated 16 times, and having won twice – you would assume that Streep has ripped open the envelope herself just once to say ‘And the winner is…’
However it is not to be.  Whilst she has appeared on stage to present two Honorary Oscars (Robert Altman and Peter O’Toole), she still to this day has not read the name of nominees and then a winner, for any Oscar category.  


2. No one has ever won an acting Oscar in a Steven Spielberg film.

When you consider films such as Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan – it is surprising that an acting award has escaped someone in a Spielberg film.  

There have been several nominations:  

Whoopi Goldberg    (A Color Purple)
Oprah Winfrey        (A Color Purple) 
Margaret Avery      (A Color Purple)
Anthony Hopkins    (Amistad)
Tom Hanks            (Saving Private Ryan)
Melinda Dillon         (Close Encounters of the Third Kind) ,  
Christopher Walken (Catch Me If You Can)
Ralph Fiennes        (Schindler’s List)
Liam Neeson          (Schindler’s List)

The best opportunity were both Fiennes and Neeson, who were upstaged on Oscar night by Tommy Lee Jones in ‘The Fugitive’ and Tom Hanks in ‘Philidelphia’ respectively. 

 

3. Steven Spielberg and Martin Scorcese have never competed against each other in the Best Director category.

Between them they have been nominated a total of 12 times.

Steven Spielberg six times (2006/99/94/83/82/78),  
Martin Scorsese six times (2007,05,03,91,89,81)

Yet have never had to compete against each other in the Directing category. 
Infact, if you also take into account the other categories that have received nominations in (ie: Best Picture / Best Writing ) there is still no match.  

 

4. Peter O’Toole has never been nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

His 8 nominations are the most by any actor who has yet to win an Academy Award.

Interestingly though, each of those eight nominations have come in the Best Actor category. 
If you look at his past nominations they all include a lead performance and never a supporting one (ie: Lawrence of Arabia / Venus / The Stunt Man / Becket).
In three of those eight nominations, he was up against Jack Lemmon.

It’s worth noting the names of the men he has lost the Oscar too:

Gregory Peck, Rex Harrison, Cliff Robertson, John Wayne, Marlon Brando, Robert DeNiro, Ben Kingsley, Forest Whitaker.

5. The same person who announced Marlon Brando the winner of ‘The Godfather’ , also announced the posthumous win of Peter Finch in ‘Network’.  

If Liv Ullman ever takes the stage to present Best Actor – you know something unpredictable will happen. 

In 1972, with Roger Moore standing beside her, she opened the envelope and read the name of ‘Marlon Brandon in The Godfather’.  Brando had declined his Oscar and sent up Sacheen Littlefeather in his place.  

(Ullman had been nominated the year prior in 1971 for Best Actress, and as such was invited to present the 1972 Best Actor Oscar) 

Four years later in 1976, she was at the podium again (this time alone), when she read the name ”Peter Finch in Network”.   Finch has died a few months prior to the Oscar ceremony and the posthumous award was initially received by the writer of the film Paddy Chayefsky who in turned brought up on stage Peter Finch’s widow. 

(For the 1976 ceremony, she was a nominee in the Best Actress category that year.)

 

 – By Rhett Bartlett

@dialmformovies

The death of a Hitchcock editor.

Williambudhoffman

Bud Hoffman, who died this week aged 81, is believed to have been the last surviving editor of an Alfred Hitchcock film. 

His sole collaboration with Alfred Hitchcock was the 1966 political thriller ‘Torn Curtain’ starring Paul Newman.  It has been reported that Hoffman was an assistant editor of Hitchcock’s “The Birds’, however he did not receive a screen credit for his contribution.

In total he only edited four feature films – Torn Curtain was his first.  After that he edited the 1968 film  ‘The Hellcats’, a movie now more famous as being part of the Mystery Science Theatre 3000 canon of spoofed films.

He teamed up again with the director of ‘The Hellcats’ – Robert F Slatzer, to edit ‘Bigfoot’ a 1970 sci-fi schlock film about the giant monster kidnapping bikers.  Slater never directed another film.

But it is his editing of Torn Curtain for which Bud Hoffman will be most remembered.   He edited the famous killing scene involving Paul Newman – a groundbreaking piece of film directing and editing that showed film audiences that baddies don’t neccessarily die after the briefest of struggles, or one violent act. 

Hoffman, a resident of Oaklahoma at the time of his passing, was an accomplished pianist and as well served two years in the Navy. 

Below is his most famous edited sequence – the killing of a german officer in ‘Torn Curtain’. 

– By Rhett Bartlett
@dialmformovies